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iPhone X: First reviews say new phone is gorgeous but Touch ID could be a huge loss

Apple has launched the iPhone X, its most advanced smartphone yet.

The handset looks fantastic, but questions are being asked about its enormous price tag and some of its features, including Face ID and the lack of a physical home button.

The iPhone X will come out on 3 November, but a number of technology publications have already had the chance to play with it.

Find their first impressions below.

The Independent – David Phelan

Most interest is focused on the iPhone X, pronounced Ten. 

It’s easy to see why – it looks amazing. And in the flesh it looks ten times more opulent than photos suggest. The stainless-steel edging gleams, the glass back is elegant and delicately coloured, and then there’s the screen. 

Cnet – Jessica Dolcourt, Scott Stein

iPhone X has an overdue design overhaul that looks great. But the extra features beyond that aren’t clear slam dunks yet.

Engadget – Chris Velazco

When Apple unveiled the iPhone X, Tim Cook said it was the reflection of the company’s vision of the smartphone of the future. Well, as impressed as I am by the X’s level of craftsmanship, performance and software thoughtfulness, I think Tim might have been overstating things. The X’s set of features are progressive for Apple, but we’ve seen quite a few of them before. I obviously can’t render a verdict without having played with an X for more than a few minutes, but here’s hoping the real deal reveals itself to be more than the sum of its parts.

TechRadar – Gareth Beavis

The iPhone X is one of the most exciting phones released this decade – but not because it offers anything particularly innovative or new. 

It’s exciting because it’s the most radical redesign of an iPhone yet, tying together a number of key trends in the industry and adding in a level of polish that will attract legions of Apple fans to upgrade, and spend another couple of years in the iCycle.

TechCrunch – Brian Heater

The X is the best iPhone, no questions, and it’s quickly jumped to the top of the best phones, period. Yeah, it’s going to cost you, but you already knew that.

Stuff – Erna Mahyuni

The X is, without a doubt, the coolest iPhone Apple has ever made – but I’m not yet sure if it’s a phone you won’t be able to live without.

All the extra bells and whistles are great, but they are exactly that: extras. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus still get that fancy new processor and wireless charging, with the latter also getting a camera update.

At the moment, it feels like you’re paying a big premium for Face ID, perfect portrait selfies, animated emojis and a slightly better (in theory) rear camera. And that cool new look, of course.

Ars Technica – Samuel Axon

While the design is elegant, we expected that. The X’s face recognition is cool, but I didn’t find it to be easier to use or much cooler than Touch ID, personally. On the other hand, I was very impressed by the screen, and I am a serious image-quality enthusiast. The screen is probably going to make the iPhone X a must-buy for the most dedicated and affluent Apple users.

If you’re a high-end Android user, I don’t know that the screen is going to be as new to you as it will be to an iPhone 6S or iPhone 7 owner. As always, the software is the most important thing.

Wired – David Pierce

The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the phones most people will own over the next year. Those got big upgrades too, with wireless charging, new designs, and similarly fantastic internals and cameras. But the X feels different. It feels like a new device, even a new kind of device for Apple. It’s a smartphone, evolved. It’s early, but I’m into it.

Mashable – Lance Ulanoff

The Apple iPhone X is everything we hoped for. It’s the true successor to the original iPhone, with lust-worthy styling, superlative materials, and a stunning amount of power and intelligence for a hand-held device.

Find the latest iPhone XiPhone 8 and iOS 11 news here.

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